1. Rocky Start of Dinosaur National Monument (USA), The World's First Dinosaur Geoconservation Site

Kenneth Carpenter

Volume 1, Issue 1 , Winter and Spring 2018, Pages 1-20

http://dx.doi.org/10.30486/gcr.2018.539322

Abstract
  The quarry museum at Dinosaur National Monument, which straddles the border between the American states of Colorado and Utah, is the classic geoconservation site where visitors can see real dinosaur bones embedded in rock and protected from the weather by a concrete and glass structure. The site was ...  Read More

2. Cave Explorers and Geoconservation in the North of England – a Changing Paradigm?

Philip Murphy; Sam Allshorn

Volume 1, Issue 1 , Winter and Spring 2018, Pages 21-23

http://dx.doi.org/10.30486/gcr.2018.539323

Abstract
  Recent cave exploration in the Yorkshire Dales glaciokarst of the north of England has mainly been achieved through the removal of sediment infill from passages and entrances. This has resulted in the linking of previously fragmented cave systems to produce the world class Three Counties Cave System. ...  Read More

3. New Mineral Discovery Geosites: Valuing for Geoconservation Purposes

Dmitry Ruban

Volume 1, Issue 1 , Winter and Spring 2018, Pages 24-27

http://dx.doi.org/10.30486/gcr.2018.539324

Abstract
  Discovery of new minerals contributes substantially to geoscience development. Localities where such discoveries have been made appear to be unique, and they deserve recognition as new mineral discovery geological heritage sites (NMD geosites). Valuing the latter is a complex procedure. Generally, it ...  Read More

4. Marketing Geotourism to Potential Australian Geotourists

Angus Robinson

Volume 1, Issue 1 , Winter and Spring 2018, Pages 28-36

http://dx.doi.org/10.30486/gcr.2018.539325

Abstract
  In Australia, geotourism is defined as tourism which focuses on an area's geology and landscape as the basis for providing visitor engagement, learning and enjoyment.Geotourism has great potential as a new nature-based tourism product. Where-ever tourism contributes a direct environmental benefit to ...  Read More

5. Geotourism and Cultural Heritage

Kerran Olson; Ross Dowling

Volume 1, Issue 1 , Winter and Spring 2018, Pages 37-41

http://dx.doi.org/10.30486/gcr.2018.540021

Abstract
  Geotourism is often thought to refer solely to ‘geological tourism’, however, more recent views suggest that the term in fact refers much more broadly to encompass not only geology, but also fauna and flora as well as cultural aspects. An area’s geo-heritage can be defined as the geological ...  Read More

7. Geotourism and Geoconservation on the Isle of Wight, UK: Balancing Science with Commerce

Martin Simpson

Volume 1, Issue 1 , Winter and Spring 2018, Pages 44-52

http://dx.doi.org/10.30486/gcr.2018.540989

Abstract
  The Isle of Wight has a rich and varied geological heritage which attracts scientists, tourists and fossil collectors, both private and commercial. Each party has a role to play in geoconservation and geotourism, but a policy on the long term curation of scientifically important specimens is essential ...  Read More