Geoconservation
1. Palaeontological And Geological Highlights Of The Black Country UNESCO Global Geopark

Graham J Worton; Colin D Prosser; Jonathan G Larwood

Articles in Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available Online from 13 June 2021

http://dx.doi.org/10.30486/gcr.2021.1922756.1084

Abstract
  The Black Country UNESCO Global Geopark, located in central England, joined the Global Geopark Network in July 2020. It is the most urban Geopark in the network with a population of approximately 1.1 million people. Located in an area rich in raw materials (Carboniferous coal, iron, and clay; Silurian ...  Read More

2. The Piesberg: A NW-German site of international importance for the Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous)

Angelika Leipner; Tobias Fischer; Patrick Chellouche

Articles in Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available Online from 14 June 2021

http://dx.doi.org/10.30486/gcr.2021.1913500.1056

Abstract
  Piesberg quarry is famous for its Upper Carboniferous plant and arthropod fossils, including several holotypes of flying insects. The high degree of maturity of the Piesberg strata, such as the presence of anthracitic coal, quartzite, and large quartz crystals, led to controversies over a possible underlying ...  Read More

3. Giant trilobites and other Middle Ordovician invertebrate fossils from the Arouca UNESCO Global Geopark, Portugal

Artur A. Sá; Sofia Pereira; Isabel Rábano; Juan Carlos Gutiérrez-Marco

Articles in Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available Online from 14 June 2021

http://dx.doi.org/10.30486/gcr.2021.1913689.1057

Abstract
  The giant Ordovician trilobites from the Canelas quarry constitute the most iconic sign of identity of the Arouca UNESCO Global Geopark at an international level. Palaeontological studies determined the importance of this fossil locality for studying aspects of the social behavior of these marine arthropods ...  Read More

Geoconservation
4. The North West Highlands UNESCO Global Geopark: Oldest Fossils in Europe

Michael Benton; Alexander J Brasier; Peter Harrison; Laura Hamlet

Volume 4, Issue 1 , Winter and Spring 2021

http://dx.doi.org/10.30486/gcr.2020.1911147.1034

Abstract
  The North West Highlands Geopark is probably one of the largest geoparks anywhere, comprising 2000 km2 of remote, mountainous and coastal terrain. It was the first European Geopark to be recognised in Scotland in 2004 and was designated by UNESCO as a Global Geopark in 2015. Since then, it has been very ...  Read More

Geoconservation
5. Management of the Palaeozoic Palaeontological Heritage Associated With Metamorphic Bedrocks: Courel Mountains UNESCO Global Geopark (Spain)

Daniel Ballesteros; Manuel García-Ávila; José B. Diez; Ramón Vila; Xosé Carlos Barros; Juan Carlos Gutiérrez-Marco; Pablo Caldevilla; Martín Alemparte

Volume 4, Issue 1 , Winter and Spring 2021

http://dx.doi.org/10.30486/gcr.2020.1912243.1039

Abstract
  The Spanish Courel Mountains UNESCO Global Geopark has strong educational and touristic resources despite limited preservation of Paleozoic invertebrate fossil assemblages within metamorphic rocks. The paleontological sites are managed by means of their inventory and integration in a Geographical Information ...  Read More

6. Exposed! The Public Life of Carboniferous Fossils in the Burren and Cliffs of Moher UNESCO Global Geopark, Ireland

Eamon Doyle

Volume 4, Issue 1 , Winter and Spring 2021

http://dx.doi.org/10.30486/gcr.2021.1917388.1073

Abstract
  Carboniferous fossils from the Burren and Cliffs of Moher UNESCO Global Geopark, County Clare, Ireland are rated by their promotional potential in the form of celebrity A, B or C-listings. Trace fossils, crinoids, brachiopods, corals and vertebrates are the most exposed to public view at a number of ...  Read More

7. Shifting Continents and a Devonian Lake Full of Fish: The Extraordinary Geological History of the Shetland Geopark

Susan R Beardmore

Volume 4, Issue 1 , Winter and Spring 2021

http://dx.doi.org/10.30486/gcr.2021.1912922.1052

Abstract
  Shetland UNESCO Global Geopark encompasses a wide variety of well-exposed and accessible geological features. The combination of ocean floor remnants on top of ancient continental crust, a cross-section through a volcano, and evidence of earth movements is preserved nowhere else in the world and, individually, ...  Read More

8. From Scientific Research to Geoconservation and Geopark

Dan Grigorescu

Volume 3, Issue 2 , Summer and Autumn 2020, , Pages 8-31

http://dx.doi.org/10.30486/gcr.2020.1904008.1025

Abstract
  The Haţeg region of Transylvania-Romania, known as the “Haţeg Country”, due to its specific character as a region wholly encircled by mountains, has been renowned for over a century for its palaeontological geosites from which dinosaur bones of several species, dinosaur eggs and hatchlings, ...  Read More

9. The Ghosts of Old Volcanoes, a Geoheritage Trail Concept for Eastern Coromandel Peninsula, New Zealand

Ilmars Gravis; Karoly Nemeth; Chris Twemlow; Boglarka Nemeth

Volume 3, Issue 1 , Winter and Spring 2020, , Pages 40-57

http://dx.doi.org/10.30486/gcr.2020.1902258.1020

Abstract
  Re-imagining the geotourism experience through the lens of slow tourism, in this paper we lay out a pathway towards a more nourishing, engaging, and educational experience that contributes to both geoconservation and a reshaping of the tourism economy in light of recent disruption caused by the Covid-19 ...  Read More

10. Geoheritage Sites and Geoconservation at Pha Chan - Sam Phan Bok Geopark, Ubon Ratchathani Province, Thailand

Vimoltip Singtuen; Krit Won-In

Volume 2, Issue 1 , Summer and Autumn 2019, , Pages 11-25

http://dx.doi.org/10.30486/gcr.2019.664490

Abstract
  The Pha Chan - Sam Phan Bok Geopark is at the easternmost part of Thailand and has the border with Laos. Furthermore, it is the most famous Mekong River Civilization area and dominated by sedimentary rocks of the Khorat Plateau. Different erosion rate produces spectacular landforms such as potholes, ...  Read More

11. Saving a Legacy: Conservation of the paleontology resources within the Garden Park National Natural Landmark, Colorado, USA

Daniel Grenard; Kenneth Carpenter; Andrew Smith; Melissa Smeins

Volume 2, Issue 1 , Summer and Autumn 2019, , Pages 45-62

http://dx.doi.org/10.30486/gcr.2019.1879246.1015

Abstract
    The Garden Park National Natural Landmark in central Colorado U.S.A. was established for 40 acres (0.16 sq. km) by the U.S. National Park Service in 1973 in recognition of its historical and paleontological significance. It was here that rather complete dinosaur skeletons were first discovered ...  Read More